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  • Writer's picturePete Jonson

Henry Thornton No 45

Today I present a small painting. It is a picture of my apartment in London with an old Lady passing down the street in front. The painting was small, W 12 inches x H 10 inches, and painted with some water paint and an amount of flakiness. Prepared in 1974, perhaps the only painting I created due to a heavy workload.

image: 'London Apartment with Old Lady' by Peter Jonson


I was lucky to become part of a small group from London, Geneva and Chicago. The London group was run by Clifford Wymer, Geneva by Alexander Swoboda and Harry Johnson ran the group in Chicago and was the overall leader. Harry had chairs in Chicago and London and was the second most published written economist in the world.


Apart from me, in London was Henryk Kirscowski, Chris Pissaridies (a future Nobel Lauriat) and several other students. The star in Geneva was Hans Genberg and two senior men, Jacob Frenkal and Rudi Dornbush, came from Chicago. David Laidler and Michael Parkin visited from Manchester. Other leading economists also invited our group to an annual meeting in Paris.


We had no excuse to avoid the hard yards in Macroeconomics and I was pleased to finish my PhD in eighteen months and then had another six months to work with the various men listed above, and others.


As part of my final work I was invited by Harry Johnson to visit his apartment and office in Chicago for six weeks or so, as he was going South. I was ensconced in Herry’s office and his Secretary popped in to tell me to keep the door locked. ‘A man has been trying to kill Harry, and he may get you by mistake’.


Overall, I was very lucky.


KULTURE

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genghiscunn
genghiscunn
Jan 22, 2023

I met Johnson at LSE a few times, he was friendly with Dick (RG) Lipsey, who I was taught by and worked for. I also worked with Laidler and Parkin. If you were ever in the Three Tuns in the '60s, we might have crossed paths.

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